Spore-Womb Piss Tree

With so many creatures wandering around Cube and feeding on the vegetation, some populations of Multi-Lobed Piss Tree began to use them to their advantage by making use of their vestigial ground leaves as they diverged into a new taxon. Spore-Womb Piss Trees share many traits with their ancestor, such as the multiple lobes for photosynthesis and their thick pisswood to deter green pissbugs and even the immune system to fend off parasites. They also still breed by releasing clouds of spores from their 4-5 large lobes at the top of their trunk, which results in a yellow mist. The Spore-Womb Piss Tree, however, has also developed another reproductive technique that gives them a competitive edge over most other species of piss trees. Since the small ground leaves really play no part in photosynthesis anymore and only produced small amounts of spores, the Spore-Womb Piss Tree has started to retain the spores within these leaves in a womb-like structure so they can be spread in a new way. The ground leaves have become larger and tubular, having become high in sugars so they can attract local herbivorous fauna to eat them. The spores within these ground leaves are now coated a tough, woody shell akin to seeds which allows them to survive the digestion process. When the organism excretes them out as waste, the spores will have fresh fertilizer to boost their growth and are often deposited far away from their parent. This adaptation has allowed the Spore-Womb Piss Tree to thrive on Cube and make up the basis of most inland ecosystems.