Some grappleclongs discovered that, by virtue of living in trees, they were literally surrounded by food. After evolving to better process this new foodsource, they became the shellclong.

The shellclong is so named for its unjointed keratinous shell. While this shell does help in reducing the damage done by clongus pellets, they are still able to be hunted by terrestrial clonguses due to their small size (which makes them prone to getting knocked off of a tree by a clongus pellet) and because their head and legs are unarmored by necessity. However, this shell isn’t just to protect them from pellets, as it also makes it more difficult for treels to strike them and helps them survive in case they fall from a great height.

Shellclongs feed on leaves using their digestive fold, which is now more of a proper pouch and can hold some material even when open. The opening to this pouch is a slit which runs down the center of their body from about the back of the first leg pair to the back of the second leg pair. Due to their true mouth no longer being used for hunting, it is basically vestigial except for breathing purposes, so the original digestive system is atrophied, allowing the digestive pouch to fill a larger portion of its body.

Shellclongs are the first clongus to communicate to each other via sound, as they are capable of using a sphincter in their normal throat to make an odd gurgling sound. These sounds can be used to indicate the presence of predators or to call for mates, which is important because they mate a lot.