Living on the cliffs provided the Clinging Radiomolds advantages, since there was not as much competition and no predators to worry about, so some Clinging Radiomolds evolved to live away from water entirely and became a new species. The Leafed Radiomold has become a fully multicellular organism, with specialized cells forming leaf-like lobes to create a larger surface area to gather larger amounts of both spite and sunlight. The Leafed Radiomolds still have a cell wall-like structure around their cells to retain water in the cold environment as well as producing adhesive secretions that stick to solid surfaces so they stay on a cliff face. Just like their ancestors, the nucleus membrane of a Leafed Radiomold cell incorporates lead into it so as to provide shielding so it doesn't irradiate itself to death since the species gets their energy from radiation along with photosynthesis and taking in ambient levels of spite. Being multicellular, binary fission is no longer enough for the Leafed Radiomold so they have gone with budding smaller clones that act almost like spores. When they do this, the tiny clones have larger leaves, which allow them to be carried by wind currents until they land on a large rock where they can then start growing.